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Kacwin

-in the County of Slovan, Hungary

The village is near Spisz in the district of Niedzica. In German it is Kacvin and in Hungarian it is Kaczvin. It is on the river Kacwin at the mouth of the Dunajec located in a wide valley that is enclosed on both sides by the North Magora (Spisz). Kacwin was also known as Kacwink, originally as Katzwinkel and Katzenwinkel. It already existed in the 13th century. It is only known that the owner Kokosz in the year 1320 sold the territory Frydman (near Niedzica), Kacwin, and Frankowa to his brother Jan and his son Michael for 100 grzywien. The Roman Catholic parish was established in 1278 but it was not known when the church was built. The church’s name is "All Saints" and the registers date from 1679.

In 1880 the village had 940 people: 832 Roman Catholics, 1 Greek Catholic, 14 Jews, and 93 non-Uniate (Greek Orthodox). There are two chapels: Holy Trinity and Saint Ann. The post office is in Starawies. The church is at an elevation of 561 m. From the west are the hills Krzyzona (Krizowa Hora) with an elevation of 767 m, Kunia Hora is 780 m, Winterleit is 723 m, Sklad 825 m, and from the east Halzyna 734 m and the hill Czerbulski is 743 m.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw

Submitted by: Stan Schmidt, 106 S. Hill Street, IL 60172 (Jun 1998)

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Kaczkowo

Current administrative location: Kaczkowo, Gmina Gniewkowo, Powiat Inowrocław, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Kaczkowo, Kreis Inowroclaw, Regierungsbezirk Bromberg, Provinz Posen, Kaiserlich Deutsches Reich.

1) Also called Kaczkowska wieś or Kaczkowerdorf (German name). A village located in powiat Inowrocław. Kaczkowo has 19 houses with 141 inhabitants (all are Evangelical Protestants). There are 9 inhabitants that are illiterate. The post office and railway station are located in Gniewkowo (German name: Argenau), which is about 4 kilometers away.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.3, p.655].

Translated by Al Wierzba, November 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Kakolo~wka

Kakolowka, a long village on the Strug, which flows from the right bank into the Wislok, and located on the Rzeszow-Dukla highway. The village, surrounded by coniferous forests, has two outlying hamlets, Newsie and Wola, and belongs to the Roman Catholic parish in Blazowa, 1 km. away. The population of 1,896 Roman Catholics works in agriculture, as well as weaving and home industry. According to a memorial submitted to the Galician administration in 1882 there were-140 weavers' shops here. They use factory-made yarn from Silesia or handmade from Grodek, but have little of their own, because they maintain that the soil is exhausted and thus cultivating flax doesn't pay. They sell good products, some locally, some in Krakow, Lwow, and even in Moldavia. Some of the finest work is even said to come back from Romania to Galicia as Romanian or Turkish goods. There is a one-class people's school here. The major estate, owned by Wl. Skrzynski, has a total area of 283 morgs of farmland and 1,365 of woods; the minor estate has 1,470 morgs of farmland, 192 of meadows and gardens, 166 of pastureland, and 230 of woods. See also Izwor and Kamienny potok. - Mac.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1882, vol. 3, p. 940].

Translated by William F. Hoffman, PGSA Winter 2000 Bulletin.

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Kalinowiec

Current administrative location: Kalinowiec, Gmina Bądkowo, Powiat Aleksandrów, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Kalinowiec, Powiat Nieszawa, Gubernia Warszawske, Vistula Land, Russian Empire.

1) A village and manor farm (folwark) located in powiat Nieszawa and gmina Bądkowo. Kalinowiec belongs to the Bądkowo Parish.

The Kalinowiec folwark has a land area of 450 morgs: 420 morgs of arable farm and garden land, 7 morgs of meadows, and 23 morgs of barren parceled land. There are 12 brick buildings, 5 wooden buildings, and 14 1/2 field crop rotations.

The village of Kalinowiec has 15 settlements on 17 morgs of cultivated land.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.3, p.681].

Translated by Al Wierzba, November 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Kamienica

1) a village in Pilzno county. In 1345 King Kazimierz granted Mikol~aj Kerstan a forest on the river Kamienica for settling a village by that name under terms of a Magdeburg charter. After 16 years of freedom from rent the settlers were to pay a ferton* of rent apiece. The soltys [district official] receives 2 lans with an inn and a mill. There is one lan for the church and one for pasture-land. The total is 60 Franconian-measure lans. In 1353 the King bestowed this village on one of his most deserving knights ("Kodeks malopolski," III, 60, 88). In 1536, the property of the Tyniec monastery, it had 14 peasants, 1 croft, a wojt property [property given a wo jt or village headman for him to use to raise food, rent out, etc.], an inn (2 grzywnas of rent) and a mill.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1883 

Submitted by: This translation, by William F. Hoffman, first appeared in the November 1997 issue of "Polish Footprints," the publication of the Polish Genealogical Society of Texas, and appears here with express permission of the PGS-TX. (Nov 1997)

Link to PGST translation - text and photos.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw. Translated by Martin Kurtin.

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Kamieniec

Current administrative location: Kamieniec, Gmina Koneck, Powiat Aleksandrów, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Kamieniec, Powiat Nieszawa, Gubernia Warszawske, Vistula Land, Russian Empire.

2) A village located in powiat Nieszawa and gmina Bądkowo. Kamieniec belongs to the Łowiczek Parish.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.3, p.748].

Translated by Al Wierzba, November 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Karczyn

Current administrative location: Karczyn, Gmina Inowrocław, Powiat Inowrocław, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Karczyn, Kreis Inowroclaw, Regierungsbezirk Bromberg, Provinz Posen, Kaiserlich Deutsches Reich.

1) A village located in powiat Inowrocław. There are 10 houses with 105 inhabitants (all Catholics). There are 42 inhabitants that are illiterate. The post office, telegraph office, and railway station are located about 11 kilometers away in Inowrocław.

2) A dominium located in powiat Inowrocław. The Karczyn dominium has an area of land equal to 3516 morgs. The Karczyn dominium has 10 houses with 182 inhabitants (167 Catholics and 15 Evangelical Protestants). There are 127 inhabitants that are illiterate. Karczyn is owned by Józef Kościelski. M.St.

The entry did not list the village's parish. The Góra Parish is located about 3-4 kilometers away.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.3, p.838].

Translated by Al Wierzba, December 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Karpa

A settlement in Augustow county, Barglow gmina and parish. It lies 16 versts [17 km.] from Augustow, and has 1 house and 1 inhabitant. [No author named].

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1882,Volume 4, page 854].

Translated by William F. Hoffman, PGSA Fall 2002 Rodziny.

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Kaszuba

An estate with a mill on the stream Zbrzyca, in the county of Chojnice, in a sandy and forested area. In size it consists of 3876 morgs. There are 17 buildings and 9 families. 115 Catholics, 2 Lutherans. The parish and school is in Lesno, the post office is in Brusy. Earlier it belonged to the Tuchola starosta-ship. In the lustration of 1664 we read that Kaszuba Mlyn (Mill) paid a rent of 92 zlote. The miller was obligated to guard the virgin forest and wild bees nests therein as he marks order, according to the railroad. In 1860 the owner was Jan Glowczewski.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1883

Translated by Gerald R. Schmidt, Pittsburgh, PA, shmitg@bellsouth.net (Feb 2003)

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Kawęczyn

Current administrative location: Kawęczyn, Gmina Gniewkowo, Powiat Inowrocław, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Kawentschin, Kreis Inowroclaw, Regierungsbezirk Bromberg, Provinz Posen, Kaiserlich Deutsches Reich.

1) A dominium located in powiat Inowrocław. The Kawęczyn dominium, including Grabie, had an area of 2745 morgs of open land. Kawęczyn has 8 houses with 153 inhabitants (121 Catholics and 32 Evangelical Protestants). There are 67 inhabitants that are illiterate. The post office and telegraph office are located in Murzynno (German name: Morin), which is about 4 kilometers away . The railway station is located in Gniewkowo (German name: Argenau), which is about 9 kilometers away.

The Slownik entry for Kawęczyn did not list a parish, but according to the Family History Library Catalog entry for the Grabie Parish, Kawęczyn (Kawentschin) belonged to the Grabie Parish.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.3, p.916].

Translated by Al Wierzba, November 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Kcynia

In German, Exin.

In old documents it is also known as "Krcenia", a city in the powiat of Szubin. The village of Kcynia is located in a hilly region, on one of the highest points in the Grand Duchy of Poznan. Because the surrounding ground is lower the city is often exposed to the winds, the soil in the area is a thick clay like substance, under which is found a layer of gravel.

In the area beneath Kcynia there is neither flowing or standing water and there are few water wells ; therefore in the summer a shortage of water often occurs;

There are four communities in addition to Kcynia Miasto (The City of Kcynia): Kcynia-settlement and three granges: Karmelin, Stahlberg and Wydartowo.

In the year 1871 there were about 254 houses, 2618 inhabitants, 605 Protestant, 1528 Catholics and 8 of other Christian beliefs and 477 Jews. In the year 1875 there were only 2591 inhabitants. In Kcynia, there were the headquarters of the district and also a Customs Office. The Catholic Parish Church was in the deanery of Kcynia.

The Protestant Church was in the Dioceses of Szubin. A synagogue also existed in Kcynia. There was a Catholic Seminary for the future teachers with a preparatory institute and an elementary school "kilkoklasowa" (Editors Note 1). There were 645 illiterates.

Trade and commerce at Kcynia has been lively over the ages, it is in present times more modest in dimension, dealing in horses, cattle and cereal grains.

An important occupation in the area is the manufacture of pottery because of the availability of good clay in the region. For this same reason there are brick works in the town and in the region that produce brick and clay drain pipes.

Located here is a Post Office of the second class and a telegraph; a postal service center for the area "poczthalterya", (Editors Note 2) personal mail from Nak?o passed through Kcynia for Wagrowiec, and from Kcynia for Gniezno; as did written mail for Gromadno and for Retkowo; There is a Railroad Station in Nak?o (Nakel), 18 km distant.

In the year 1811 Kcynia had 243 houses and 1411 inhabitants; in the year 1831 about 214 houses and 1834 inhabiants; in the year 1837 about 2074 inhabitants. From April 1842, there were four two day fairs: with stalls for horses and cattle.

Apart from the Parish Church, consecrated to St Egidius and funded by Wladyslawa Herman (1079-1102), there is still in existance a second church with an old Monastery of the Carmelite monks and a chapel containing a miraclous painting that attracts many pilgrims.

In the year 1262 Boleslaw, Duke of Wielkopolska granted a charter to Kcynia under the Madgeburg laws: the city administered an area from Poznan to Gniezno. In Kcynia during the 13th century Dukes Boleslaw and Przemyslaw of Wielkopolska negotiated with their uncle Swietopelk Duke of Pomerania a treaty to be able to regain the castle at Nak?o and control of the area to Poles.

In times past Kcynia was the capital of the powait (district) under the jurisdiction of the general of Wielkopolska. It was also a place of annual Calissian nobility meetings. Resided also at Kcynia a "starosta niegrodowy" Editors note 3" a kind of district leader,

In the year 1441 a great fire destroyed the whole city; Almost all of the houses were rebuilt of stone, but by the 18th Century the area was in a state of decline.

Raczynski in his Memories of Wielkopolska ( 11 p 392) mentions the city in the 16th century and its considerable commerce. When in the year 1594 Sigismund (Zygmunt III) Vasa returned from Sweden he passed through the area, in Kcynia trade and craftsmen asked him to guarantee their profits from business, endangered by Scottish craftsmen who settled in the area.

In the year 1772 the city came under Prussian dominance. Kcynia, as a district of the Calissian voivodship, was a center of political, administrative and judicial authority for the area, according to the lists from the year 1661 the city encompasses: Kcynia, Miesciska and the villages of Demblowo, Borzatew and Wiela.

In the year 1771 after Andrzej Mielzynski and Anna Bni?ska were Kcynia's "Starosta"s, Kazimierz Radonski, a Colonel in the Army, was. He paid so-called "quarter-tax" of 41 0z?oty and winter-tax "hyberna" of 473 z?oty and 6 groszy.

After the creation of a Governor for Gniezno province, Kcynia was included in the provincial administration of this area. About the year 1765 there were 1928 Jews in the province of Kcynia

Editors Note 1 .... The term "Kilkoklasowa" refers to village / city
elementary school with more then one class. When there were 5 or 10 children of school age and one teacher in small settlement, only one class have may have been organized with various exercises that concerned of the age of school child; the multi-class school was something bigger and better;

Editors Note 2 ... The term "Poczthalterya"- postal service stand; it is less then post office, usually managed by civil inn-owner; it was a stopping station for rest, food and horses or stagecoaches on postal routes.

Editors Note 3 .... starosta, a kind of district foreman, a royal official in Poland in the 14th-18th century, in charge of treasury and police activities, and the judiciary starostwo, the office or property or jurisdiction of a starosta, q. v.; sometimes affiliated

Editors Note 4 ... On being elected King of Poland in 1857, Sigismund (Zygmunt III) Vasa succeeded his uncle Stefen. In 1594 he was crowned King of Sweden following the death of his father, Johan III. He left Sweden in charge of his uncle, Carl, in 1594 while he visited Poland. Carl saw the opportunity to seize the throne and Sigismund had to return with his army to try to regain the throne. He lost a battle fought at Stangebro in 1598 and conceded Sweden to his uncle the following year.

Translated by Jim Piechorowski & Wiktor Karpowicz (Warsaw Pl, July 2005), PGSA Member 6005; families: Piechorowski/Piechurowski 1780.

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Kijewo

Current administrative location: Kijewo, Gmina Gniewkowo, Powiat Inowrocław, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Kijewo, Kreis Inowroclaw, Regierungsbezirk Bromberg, Provinz Posen, Kaiserlich Deutsches Reich.

1) A dominium located in powiat Inowrocław. The Kijewo dominium had an area of 1908 morgs of open land. Kijewo has 8 houses with 110 inhabitants (94 Catholics and 16 Evangelical Protestants). There are 45 inhabitants that are illiterate.The post office is located 4 kilometers away in Murzynno (German name: Morin). The railway station and telegraph office are located in Gniewkowo (German name: Argenau), which is about 6 kilometers away.

A few years ago, Kijewo was owned by the Kozłowski family, but now it has passed into German hands.

The Slownik entry for Kijewo did not list a parish. The Murzynno Parish is located 4 kilometers away, so this could possibly be the parish for Kijewo.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.61].

Translated by Al Wierzba, November 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Kiko~l~

In a document from the year 1236 "castrum Kychol". A town in Lipno county. At first a princely castle mentioned in a document of Konrad, prince of Mazovia, in the year 1236 (Kod. dypl. pol., 11, 16). At that time there already existed "Kycholiensis districtus" next to the district of Wloclaw in Cujavia

In 1395 in Lipno, Janussius, the owner of the village "Kychol", possessing 80 hides of land, sells them to the master of the Knights of the Cross, Konrad von Jungingen, counting each hide (sown? settled ?) as well as (unsown? unsettled?) for 10 grzywna's. (Kod. dypl. pol., 11, 804). In 1564 the part of the village with the parish church in Dobrzyn-land, belonged to Jerzy Moszczeniski; the second half to Jakob Orlowski. The first part has 14 hides, 7 cottages and 2 inns. The second part has 12 hides, 6 cottages and 1 inn with a smithy. The tax taken in was 16 florins, 17 grzywna's. In 1564 the second part became part of the then-existing parish of Grodzen

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1883

Submitted & translated by Gerald R. Schmidt, Pittsburgh, PA, shmitg@bellsouth.net (Feb 2001)

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Klepary

Current administrative location: Klepary, Gmina Gniewkowo, Powiat Inowrocław, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Klepary, Kreis Inowroclaw, Regierungsbezirk Bromberg, Provinz Posen, Kaiserlich Deutsches Reich.

A dominium located in powiat Inowrocław. The Klepary dominium has an area of 1040 morgs of open land. Klepary has 3 houses with 97 inhabitants (72 Catholics and 25 Evangelical Protestants). There are 43 inhabitants that are illiterate. The post office and telegraph office are located 1.5 kilometers away in Murzynno (German name: Morin). The railway station is located in Gniewkowo (German name: Argenau), which is about 7 kilometers away.

The Slownik entry for Klepary did not list a parish. The Murzynno Parish is located 1.5 kilometers away, so this could possibly be the parish for Klepary.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.133].

Translated by Al Wierzba, November 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Klikuszowa

– in the county of Nowy Targ

The village lies on the brook Lepietnica. Five kilometers directly southeast of the village is Nowy Targ. It has a boarder with Obidowa on the northeast, on the south with Lasek and northwest with Sieniawa and Rdzawka (in the county of Myslenice). Klikuszowa from southeast to southwest stretches almost 3 Km.

The larger estate has 36 Austrian morg of farmland, 5 in fields and gardens, in pastures and 35 in forests. The smaller estate has 1003 of farm land, 165 Austrian morg of fields and gardens, 351 in pastures and 71 of forest. The owner is Konrad Fihauser

The village has the following population:

Year Houses People

1777 . . 94 . . 451
1799 . 101 . . 556
1824 . 112 . . 584
1869 . 132 . . 714 (352 men and 362 women)
1880      . . . . 684

The records of the Tarnow Archdiocese in 1880 lists 710 people, and in 1882 lists 700 Roman Catholics.

On the east side of the village is the hill Skalka (822 m in elevation) that ends west at the Gorce Hills. On the eastern border is the brook Klikuszowa.

The village already existed in 1234 under the name" Klikuszowa" belonging to the foreman of Nowy Targ and before that to Radultow and to the cloister in Szczyrzyc. Documents from 1636 indicate 20 stockyards, 1 hut, a few rooms for the working farmers (no count was taken), and a local administrator. The total taxes that year were 277 zolty and 24 groszy. In 1660, documents indicate 12 stockyards, 1 mill and a local administrator. And in 1765, the documents indicate 15 farms, 8 fenced gardens, 2 mills and a local administrators Samuel and Simon Szprwinski. The total taxes were 1512 zloty and 26 groszy. The local administrator’s position existed in 1536, and the present administrator was imprisoned for 3 years.

The records of 18 October 1772 indicate that the mansion and farm buildings were destroyed and there was a mill with one rock, a sawmill, and a tavern turned into a house. The land areas included in the village were: Rabica, Pasiek, beyond the mill Okrag and Janow; fields: Mala and Wielka Bukowina, Tyn, Rosule, Solisko, Spalone and Obidowiec. The Rabica forest was destroyed. In 1824 Klikuszowa contained the following areas: Niwa, Obidowa, Lasek, Morawczyna, Pyzowka, Pieniazkowice, Dzial, Odrowaz, Dlugopole and Zaluczne. There is a wooden Roman Catholic church built in 1753 named for St. Martin the Bishop; the parish is affiliated with Nowy Targ. The records of the church started in 1786. A new concrete church was built in 1878. The villages belonging to the parish are Lasek, Morawczyna, Obidowa, and Pyzowka. There are 3036 Roman Catholics and 29 Jews. There is a school with one classroom and one teacher. The post Office is in Nowy Targ. Klikuszowa is famous for hunting thrush.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw

Submitted by: Stan Schmidt, 106 S. Hill St., Roselle, IL 60172 (Jun 1998)

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Kloniczno

Kloniczno, also Klaczno, German Klonczen or Klontzen, a village in BytÑw powiat, referred to in documents as Klonych, in Pomerania. At the beginning of the 15th century it was owned by Janusz Kwiatoszyc ("Hannos Quettoschitz"). In 1428 Teutonic Knights grand master Paul von Russdorf exchanged with him for this village (Male Kloniczno), which then had 17 wlÑkas, and gave him 12 wlokas in Czarna Dabrowa, in addition to 4 morgs of marsh (a peat-bog) in Klipy, under terms of Magdeburg law. In return Janusz served in war on a horse valued at 6 marks, answering every summons, helping erect new castles and tear down old ones; he also contributed 1 pound of wax, and 1 Chelmno pound of plow-tax [?fun. chelm. pluznego], and 1 bushel of oats. In 1487 Kloniczno had 10 wlokas of land, five of which were empty, each taxed at 8 skot., and an inn paying 2 marks, for a total of 1 mark 16 skot. per wloka, and 7 poskow [? - even the author didn't know what this was] of mead. In 1658, before the war, Stare Kloniczno had 1 soltys and 6 gburs, the soltys served in the war on horseback [Translator's note: the war referred to is presumably the war with Sweden, 1655-1660]. After the war there was 1 gbur with 2 horses and 1 cow, and the other places were empty. In 1662 the soltys paid 150 florins on 2 cultivated wlokas -and 3 empty ones, and the gburs paid 6 florins per wloka. The two nobles no longer performed any castle service. At that time the soil was described in writings as sandy; there was no hay, although the village lies near Lake Kloniczno.

There is a patch of primeval forest about 7.5 km. wide and 15 km. long, stretching from Sumin to Oslowa Dabrowa; it produces no revenue, although coal merchants pay several zl. from it. There is also a large pine forest, stretching from Ugoszcz to Studzienice and Czarna Dabrowa. Oaks and beeches grow in it; there is food there for 360 hogs. On-site is a Catholic school, and there are more than 220 Catholic faithful, of Ugoszcz parish. Cmp. Przewoz.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1883, vol. 4, p. 188].

Translated by William F. Hoffman, PGSA Fall 1997Bulletin.

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Klonówka

Klonowka, German Klonowken, in 1565 called Renkieczkie in documents, a knightly estate in Starogard [Gdanski] powiat, in a beautiful site on the Wierzyca river, which makes numerous bends here and has steep banks surrounded by woods. Klonowka includes the farmsteads of Mosty, Najmusy and Marywil, which belong to the estate; it covers an area of 5,363 morgs, with 497 Catholic and 8 Protestant inhabitants, and 37 houses. It has a parish church and school, a large garden with a park, and a new manor; the post office is in Pelplin. The distance from Starogard is 1 mila [about 7.5 km.], to Pelplin half a mila.

We know nothing from any source about the founding of this village and its first charter. However there is no doubt that it is a very old settlement; this is attested by, among other things, a pagan burial-ground located by the village. In the southwest side of the village, in the woods to the left of the road to Barchnowy, many stone circles were torn down at various times. There are also numerous commonæ graves of stone and isolated urns in Klonowka. In 1887 one circle still existed, but it too was partially damaged. See Ossowski's "O wspomnieniach przedhistor. Prus krol." [On prehistorical memories of Royal Prussia] in the first yearbook of the Towarzystwo Nauk w Toruniu, p. 37, and the same author's Mapa archeolog. Prus zach. [Archeological map of West Prussia], pp. 23, 46, 82.

From its beginning this village was a royal estate. Subsequently, due to hard times in the 15th century, it was apparently pawned to the Czarlinskis, who along with their descendants claimed the rights of ownership. There is an interesting entry on this in Krzysztof Czarlinski's summary of incomes, in which Klonowka with its monetary rents and fiefs and farmstead was appraised at 446 florins, 8 pence. But during an audit of this village a royal decree issued at the Sejm was produced, saying: "Czarlinski, Renkieczkie, 11 March, Pawel and Jurek Czarlinski produced a grant of lifetime tenure to the village of Renkieczkie from the late King Zygmunt to Stanislaw Czarlinski, given accordingly that he ceded to His Majesty the king a second village of his tenancy, Wunthal (?), both of which villages he held previously in lifetime tenure for a thousand zloty's bequeathed to the kings by his ancestors. This letter testifies to the lifetime tenure, a new one cannot be made. The Czarlinskis are to return to the first possession and tenancy what their ancestor was to hold for redemption before receipt of the lifetime tenure. As regards improvements to the village, such as the mill they had built at their own expense, this also they will hold with the villages for redemption. Nothing will be held out from the Commonwealth or His Majesty, for everything beyond the redemption of the pledge will come to His Majesty." See the copy of the summary in Peplin. The auditors' protest was effective in that long afterward Klonowka is still numbered among the royal estates.

The local proprietors, all nobles without exception, call themselves tenants or leaseholders of Klonowka, as did, for instance, the tenant Czarlinski in 1580, and before him Hieronim Buczynski, Sieradz starosta. In 1686 Wolf was the tenant of Bar. Ludwik Luddinghausen. In 1719 Maryanna Kosowa nee Wolf, wife of the Chelmno Palatine, increased the number of wlokas belonging to the pastor, and her brother, Jerzy Kazim. Wolf, dean of the Warmia chapter, renovated the church. In 1732 Maryanna Rychtarska nee Kalkstein held Klonowka. In 1740 it was Maryanna Pawlowksa nee Kalkstein, her husband was Jan Pawlowski, Mirachowo judge. Around 1760 Jerzy Kalkstein, Chelmno standard-bearer, acquired the property of the village of Klonowka. In 1780 Jerzy Kalkstein, Chelmno chamberlain, owned Najmusy, Mosty and Marywil as well as Klonowka. In 1789 Maryanna Pawlowska nee Kalkstein, wife of the Michalowo judge, bequeathed legacies to the church in Klonowka. The current owner is Michal Kalkstein.

The church in Klonowka has existed for a long time, and the 1867 diocesan summary writes of its condition. The parish church in Klonowka, called St. Catherine's, is of private patronage, and it is not known when it was foundedæand consecrated. Next to it is a shelter for three poor people. The parish numbers 1,678 souls. The villages served by the parish are: Klonowka, Mosty, Lipinki, Rywald, Brzezno, Nowydwor, Debina, Najmusy, Marywil. There are four parochial schools: one in Klonowka with 62 Catholic children, one in Rywald with 84, one in Brzezno with 68, and one in Nowydwor with 52.-Rev. F[rydrychowicz]

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1883, vol. 4, p. 161-162].

Translated by William F. Hoffman, PGSA Summer 1997 Bulletin.

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Kłopot

Its German name is Neusorge. A folwark located in powiat Inowrocław. There are 3 houses with 123 inhabitants. Kłopot belongs to the Orłowo dominium.

The entry did not list the village's parish. The Orłowo Parish is located about 2-3 kilometers away.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.189].

Translated by Al Wierzba, December 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Kobielice

Current administrative location: Kobielice, Gmina Zakrzewo, Powiat Aleksandrów, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Kobielice, Powiat Nieszawa, Gubernia Warszawske, Vistula Land, Russian Empire.

A village and colony located in powiat Nieszawa and gmina Sędzin. The village belongs to the parish of Kobielice. It has a wooden church that was built in the 17th century. In 1827, there were 10 homes with 83 inhabitants.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.202].

Translated by Al Wierzba, May 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Kobiernice

- in the County of Biala

A village on the left bank of the Sola, the the highland vicinity that belongs to the Roman Catholic parish in Kety, from which it is 4 Km away to the south.The township of Kobiernice has a boundary on the south with Porebka, on the west with Bujakow and on the east with Czarniec.

It has 1157 inhabitants (Roman Catholic), 43 of whom live in the region of the larger property of Stanislaw Tomkowicz, which has an area of 480 acres of farm and 100 acres of forest; the smaller property has 750 acres of farm, 90 acres of meadows and gardens, 390 acres of pastures and 75 acres of forests. There is a little brick church here, built by the peasants in 1867, in which services are held. The township is trying to establish a permanent rectory. 

In the 15th century it was the estate of Melchor of Debowiec barony of Kornicz. 

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1883 

Submitted by: Joan Schmidt, 106 S. Hill St., Roselle, IL 60172 (Dec 1996)

Families of members doing research in Kobiernice. Click on researcher name to send E-mail.

Surname Date Researcher
Hankus 1807 Joan Schmidt
Jura 1784 Joan Schmidt
Kolodziejczyk 1806 Joan Schmidt
Simonetti 1807 Joan Schmidt
Szemla 1806 Joan Schmidt
Sztafa 1792 Joan Schmidt
Witowski 1784 Joan Schmidt

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Kobylanka

A village in Gorlice county, lying on the right bank of the Ropa, near the mouth of the Sekowa, 5 km. north of Gorlice; it has a Roman Catholic parish church and numbers 1,328 Roman Catholic inhabitants, of which 72 reside on the grounds of the major estate. Its land, situated in the river valley, is fertile, and its woods are guarded. Besides agriculture, the populace is employed in making pottery. Kobylanka is the administrative seat of a significant estate with numerous oil wells. It was once the property of the Wielopolskis, then later of the Jablonowskis, and currently the grounds of the major estate belong to the successors of Aleks. Skrzynski. There is a people’s school and a beautiful palace with a park. The major estate has 358 mórgs of farmland, 66 of meadows and gardens, 84 of pastureland, and 145 of forests; the minor estate has 685 mórgs of farmland, 138 of meadows and gardens, 197 of pastureland, and 60 of forests.

It is not known when the parish was founded, but it existed by 1655. The current church, made of stone, with a copper roof, was built by Ignacy Count Wielopolski in 1750. In the church is a painting of the Crucified Savior, according to tradition blessed by Pope Urban VIII and given to Jan, Count Wielopolski na Zywcu. There are numerous pilgrimages to this miraculous image, from spring all the way to winter. Besides the parish church there are three stone chapels here, to wit, one with an image of Our Lady of Sorrows, another at the church cemetery, and a third at the public cemetery. The parish belongs to the Diocese of Przemysl, deanery of Biecz. There are four villages in it: Dominikowice, Kleczany, Mecina Wielka and Mecina Mala. The total number of inhabitants of the whole parish is 2,942 Roman Catholics and 16 Jews.—[Mac. {Dr. Maurycy Maciszewski}, Vol. 4, p. 210].

[Supplemental information from Volume 15-1]: Kobylanka, a village in Gorlice county. A document from 1381 mentions the villages Kobyla (no longer existing), Kobylanka, and Kleczany (Kod. mal., Vol. III, 335). It seems that by the 15th century there was a parish church here, transferred from Dominikowice, where it was originally. 16th-century tax registers mentioning the villages comprising this parish omit Dominikowice. (L. B., II, 284).—[No author given, Vol. 15-2, page 95].

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego

Translated by William F. Hoffman, PGSA Summer 2003 Rodziny.

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Kociewiacy

A distinct Polish–Pomeranian tribe in West Prussia, inhabiting the area called Kociewie (see entry for Kociewie). This area is located between the cities of Starogard Gdański, Tczew, Gniew, and Nowe. The easiest way to recognize a Kociewiacy is by speaking with one. As they do not speak proper Polish, because the 3rd person past tense plural ends differently with an "eli". They say, "that during the rye and wheat harvest they would take a job with both hands, and after they raked the barn clean. The merchants would come to buy corn, among other things" (this sentence was structured with all 3rd person past tense endings with "eli" instead of "li", to point out the Kociewiacy's incorrect Polish). Not only in Powiat Starogard, and in Powiat Kwidzyn, lying on the left side of the Wisła, will you encounter these linguistic characteristics, but also along the right side of the Wisła River in the lowlands of Powiat's of Malbork and Sztum. We can also recognize the Kociewiacy women by their dress, but only the married and the old, which is usually a long silk scarf wrapped around the head with two artificially interwoven knots protruding toward the face. A rough number of Kociewiacy probably could be found in their church records. So, in 1867, the number of Catholic souls were counted in the districts of Kociewie. The totals were as follows: the Gniew Deanery had 24,000, the Starogard Deanery had 16,000, the Nowe Deanery had 20,000, the Tczew Deanery had 15,000, and the sum approximately totaled 75,000. However, given the number of souls in these deaneries, from 1867, have grown considerably and will join with the people from the adjacent area (powiat's Malbork and Sztum). Independently speaking, there are at least 100,000 Kociewiacy.

Among the population are three layers: workers, peasants, and nobility (to specify most farm owners were here in this layer), because there are so many affluent farm owners densely settled in the Kociewie area of West Prussia. Because the land of Kociewie is the property of the densely settled West Prussian farm owners, there are so many of them here that are prosperous. They've never settled under a lease, only their grandparents and great-grandparents had leased land from the starosta's wife or the monastery. The nobleman and other villagers did not meet (interact), possibly a few lived together to help out the gardeners. They possess places of 1, 2, or 4 włok of land, sometimes you'll find extensive holdings something like the large lordly Chłemno folwarks, worth from 50 to 100,000 talar. Few of the farm owners are in the villages, most of this arrogant separation happened after they built homes on their own lands. The old houses and buildings were built with wood, now it is preferred to build with brick. There were nice times in the past. There was no separation between the noblemen and the workers. Sometimes fairly wealthy farm owners ate and worked together with the workers, almost since childhood. But they also respected the servants. The workers would never say "he" or "she", only "Sir Father" otherwise to his wife "Madam Mother". Also, the children called the old Noblemen "parents" in old Polish. Now farm owners are a bit richer, since they've succeeded they avoid service that is to great to bear and almost perform no manual work. The workers at the table do not sit together. Only the Nobleman's servants' quarters are located separately at the house and he demands that they call him by his title. The Noblemen had arranged and built a new kind of manor house in the city, adorned with tapestry and mahogany furniture. To church or to the city, the nobles traveled by coachman driven vehicles. When in the past, the nobles would normally ride by the free trolley service. It is no wonder then that more and more debts are increasing and many farms are declining. Although this is not a rare case, that a farm owner saves himself not 10, but 30 to 50,000 on his farm. Around parts they moved carefully in a progressive manner with the lands, where and how they could improve. Some of the richer farm owner villages are: Barłożno, Bobowo, Brzeźno, Brzuszcz, Dąbrówka, Dzierzążno, Garc, Gogolewo, Gąsiorki, Gętomie, Gorzędziej, Grabowo, Jaźwiska, Komorsk, Kursztyn, Królów Las, Kulice, Liguowy (the existing farm owning gentry have been Germanized), Lubiszewo, Nowa Cerkiew, Pieniążkowo, Piaseczno, Półwieś, Pomyje, Rajkowy, Rakowiec, Rudno (the existing farm owning gentry have been Germanized), Rzeżęcin, Rywałd, Rątarg, Skurcz, Subkowy, Wielbrandowo, Włosienica, Walichnowy and others. Relatively less Noble estates can be found and even less are in the hands of the Polish: they can be counted with fingers.The Jackowski's hold the Jabłowo estate, Kalkstein's - the Klonowken estate, Grąbczewski's - the Barchnowy estate, Bardzik's - the Wysoka estate, and Praneccy - the sandy Grabowiec estate. The largest part of the estates, after those of Counts Dąbski, Czapski, Tuchołka and others, passed into the German hands of the Prussian Government. Such as: Kopytkowo, Janie, Kornatki, Kozielec, Luchowo, Milewo, Ostrowite, Rynkówko, Smętowo, Smarzewo, Spęgawsk, Sumin, Owiidz, Bielsk, Janisaewo, Jeleń, and more.

The Kociewiacy's purely dry Polish speech has been preserved to this day. Certain traces probably originate from the times of the German Teutonic Knights. For example: dycht = dobze, doskonale (well, well); ruma (is not) = miejsca (place); fertych = gotowy, zrobiony (ready made); apen = otwarty (open); sztyf = zawsze (always); and many others. Provincial notables: zamanąwszy = często (often); besztefrant, na besztefrant co mówić = mówić co przekręcając, udając. The Kociewiacy pronounce the syllables (en, em, ę), and sometimes (im, in) fully lipped as (an, am) in old Polish (similar to en and em in French). For example: świanty = święty, gans = gęś, lan = len, wszystkami sposobami = wszystkimi, and others.

Faith and devotion were shared with all the Polish people. Numerous people from Łak to Gietrzwałd attend the religious carnival at the Calvary of Wejherowska. For it and Piaseczno (where the famous and miraculous image of Our lady is located), is where they all gather in Kociewie. There is a second picture of the Blessed Mother that is found in Nowy Cierkwi, near Pelplin. Some customs were preserved from the old times. For example: whistles, visiting the Advent stars, celebrating Christmas with a star lit nativity scene, smagust (restraint from excesses) for Easter, and others. Quite frequently, particularly the elders, tell fantastic tales, stories, and songs from around the world (frantówek) that they know.

Almost exclusively the Kociewiacy are employed in agriculture. Also, in more recent times, industry has made gains: three sugar factories are in Tczew, Pelplin, and Gniew; a cheese factory in Czerwińsk; ordinary alcohol production is in the larger estates; distilleries and breweries are in the cities; and others. There are four banks or loan companies: Starogard (Gdański), Gniew, Bobowo, and Nowe. Significant progress in farming is owed to quite a few agricultural companies existing in Piaseczno, Bobowo, formerly in Skórcz, and now other villages. Concerning the national temperament, it is experienced and religious. Among other things, the Kociewiacy provide religious and political rallies. Particularly in recent critical times, they were arranged in Skórcz, Nowe Cerkwi, Gniew, Pelplin, and others. They witnessed their favorites at the amateur theater presented in the villages of Kociewie (Pelplin, Bobowo, Piasecznao, Skórcz, Barłożno, Lubichowo, Starogard Gdański, and others...), however, not at all deftly. With each year, there are more and more young educated people, farmers, civil servants, and doctors thanks to the superior local school, which in general the Kociewiacy urgently use. And so it is in Pelplin, under clerical care of the pro-school bishops (Colleg. Marianum) and all the schools in Starogard Gdański and Tczew. Preparatory schools for teachers exist in the villages of Gniew, Starogard Gdański, Pelplin, and Skórcz. Until recently, there was a boarding school for girls (the Sisters of Mercy) in Pelplin, currently it is still in Kościerzyna. Newspapers are eagerly read by the Kociewiacy, namely the outgoing "Pilgrim" in Pelplin; "The Cross" a religious journal (formerly the "Farmer" for farm owners); the "Friend" from Toruń; the "Friend of the People" from Poznań (formerly from Chłemno); the "Great Poland (Wielkopolskie) Messenger" and the "Advocate" from Poznań, and others. Also, many parishes and manors diligently made use of furnished reading rooms.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, pp.228-230].

Translated by Al Wierzba, September 2010. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Kociewie

A land called Kociewie that is in West Prussia. It occupies more or less the whole district (powiat) of Starogard and part of the neighboring district of Kwidzyn, positioned at the left bank of the Wisła. Its northern border is at Żuława where Powiat Gdańsk begins, its western border is Powiat Kościerzyna where Kaszubia is located, and its southern border is Świecie. From the east, the Wisła River constitutes as its boundary. The length of the land from north to south is 6 mila long and its core width is 4 mila. The name Kowiecie probably comes from the numerous basins (i.e, the swamps and marshes surrounding the mountains), in which the most hilly areas are facing the mountains and surrounded by meadows and lowlands in ice. To this day it is called "Kociełkami".

Nearly the center by itself, stretches from the west to east band of the Baltic-Ural hills (Uralisch-baltischer Landsrucken). The most prominent river, besides the Wisła, is the Wierzyca, which flows into the Węgiermuca, the Jonek stream, the Milcicha (now the Liszki), and the Bacha. Lakes are also present, like: Lake Czarne near Skórcz, Lake Czarnoleskie, the Great Lakes of Osieckie, Lake Borzechowskie, Lake Sumińskie, Lake Spęgawskie, Lake Pienążkowskie, Lake Płochocińskie, and others. Kociewie has adequate supplies of fuel. Up to now, the beginning portions of the Great Tuchoła Forest belong to Kociewie. Moreover, the lesser forests stretch for a long, narrow, strip near Borkowo, Pelplin, Klonówki, and Spęgawsk. Then more separately by Gniew and Opalenie. Peat bogs are quite numerous here in the meadows and marshes, particularly in Grabowo, Grabwiec, Brzeźno, Smoląg, etc. The soil, for the most part, is fertile, and it yields all sorts of types of grains, such as: wheat, rye, barley, peas, oats, turnips, etc.

There are atleast 3 cities in Kociewie: Nowe, Gniew, and Starogard Gdański; besides those, there are 2 markets: Skórcz and Pelplin (which is also the Bishopric of Chłemno). The population for the most part is Polish, particularly within the villages (see Kociewiacy). Churches that you encounter are relatively numerous and well to do in this area. The following Catholic Parishes, in addition to the cities, belong to Kociewie: Bobow, Dąbrówka, Klonówka, Lubichowo, Barłożno, Skórcz, Kóscielna Jania, Lalkowy, Pieniążkowo, Grabowo, Dzierzążno, Pelplin, Walichnowy, Nowa Cerkiew, Garc, Królów Las, Piaseczno, Opalenie al. Misterwałd, Pączewo, Czarny Las, Tymawa, Subkowy, Lignowy, Rajkowy, Jabłowo, Komorsk, Płochocin, and others. The following Lutheran Parishes, in addition to the cities, belong to Kociewie: Budnie, Skórcz, Borzechowo, and Osie.

Railways in both directions pass through Kociewie: the following stations are from the north-south Tczew-Bydgoszcz railway line: Tczew, Subkowy, Pelplin, Czerwińsk, and Warlubie. The north-west end of the second and new Tczew-Piła railway line, cuts through the following stations: Swarożyn, Starogard Gdański, and Zblewo. Well travelled roads are relatively quite numerous: 1) the Gdańsk-Bydgoszcz Road is near Subkowy, Rudno, Pelplin, Gniew, Nowe, and Warlubie; 2) Kwidzyń-Czerwińsk; 3) Czerwińsk-Skórcz-Starogard Gdański; 4) Jabłowo-Pelplin; 5) Chojnice-Starogard Gdański-Tczew. In addition there is a planned road from Gniew to Morzeszczyna, where there will be a new Tczew-Bydgoszcz railway station continuing sideways to Skórcz. Kś. F.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.230].

Translated by Al Wierzba, September 2010. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Koczal~a

in German  Flotenstein, in documents  Vliesensteyn, a church-owned village in Czlucho w county, on the stream Hamer that flows from the nearby lake to the river Brda, near the Pomeranian border. Its area encompasses 19,679 morga's, with 359 buildings, 169 houses; there are 1,227 Catholics and 299 Protestants. There are a parish church, a school, and a post office in the village.

The village of Koczala was originally an estate owned by nobles. In 1366 Aleksander Stange -- with the knowledge and permission of the Czlucho w Teutonic Knights Commander Heinrich von Thaba and of his brother Paul Stange, lord of Strzeczow -- handed over his village Vliesen-Steine, covering 60 wloka's, to the soltys Herman with a charter based on Chelmno law. The soltys was to have every 10th wlo ka, every 3rd penny in legal fines, and half the rent from the tavern.  In addition he had the right to catch fish in the village's lake and streams for his own table, and if there was a mill established there, he was to have the right to free milling. Stange set aside 4 wlo ka's for the church. "From the rest, after 9 exempt years the settlers are to give us 14 skot's and perform 1 day of road maintenance work annually. As for the soltys, he shall be ready to respond to our summons, armed and riding a horse valued at 6 marks. The soltys and farmers shall also give the Archbishop a tithe of 2 skojec per wloka." In 1378 Petzch Stange issued a charter to a mill in the village of Vliesenstein, to which he added a meadow, 6 morga's of farmland, and an additional wlo ka. "For this the miller Geroslaw shall pay 10 marks from the mill, and 15 hens for the wlo ka." It is not known when or how this village passed from private ownership. See Dreger's Odpisy, manuscript in Peplin.

From the diocesan outline of its holdings we excerpt the following: the parish of Koczala numbers 2,260 souls, and is named for St. Mary Magdalene, under the government's patronage; it is not known when it was endowed and consecrated, but the current church was built in 1695, and it has had a Sobriety Fraternity since 1858. There is a branch church in Starzno. The villages of the parish are: Koczala, Lakie, Bielsk, Steinforth, Hamer, Pflastermuhl, Darzno, Stara Brda, Rummelsberg, Reinfeld, and Schwessin. Parish schools: a 2-class one in Koczala with 237 Catholic children, one in Starzno with 44 children, one in Lakie with 53. About 80 Catholic children attend Protestant schools. In earlier times there also were two more branch churches in this parish, in Darzno and in Lakie. [Rev. Frdrychowicz, Vol. IV, p. 236]

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw  

Translated by William F. Hoffman for the PGSA Newsletter Autumn, 1998.

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Kodzie

A village in the parish of Kopciowo, rural district of Pokrowsk, Sejny County. Kodzie is 26 versts from Sjeny and has 18 houses with 120 inhabitants.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1882 [Vol. 4, p. 242]

Translated by Dorothy Leivers, Hadlow, Kent, England, Dorfleiv@aol.com (May 2004)

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Kolbuszowa, Kolbuszowa Dolna, Kolbuszowa Go~rna

Kolbuszowa: 1) county seat [miasto powiatowe] in Galicia, lies in a wooded and sandy region, on the river of the same name; it has a rather large pond and is surrounded by pine forests. It is a tidy-looking town, comprised mainly of wooden residences which show white amid the greenery of beautiful orchards and gardens; for this reason it looks like an oasis in the middle of a sandy wasteland. In addition to the stone church on the town's west side, noteworthy are the elegant buildings of the major estate, and farther south a rifle-range, powder-magazine, brewery, brickyard, and a windmill on a slightly elevated spot. As Kuropatnicki tells in his Geografia Galicyi, in the 17th century there was a famous palace here, beautifully constructed, all of wood with headless nails wrought by the local ironworkers; but in the course of time it deteriorated and was finally torn down on the order of Count Jerzy Tyszkiewicz. The famous Kolbuszowa transaction took place here in 1753, that is, the distribution of the lands of the Ostrog estate in tail by the last heir, Prince Janusz Aleksander Sanguszko, Lithuanian marshal; this became a sort of national affair in that it provoked a number of quarrels and lawsuits and created an uproar in several Sejm's, until it was finally confirmed by a 1766 enactment. Also to be found here was a fortified castle, destroyed in 1769 by members of the Confederation of Bar.

This town is better known, however, for the industry of its residents; for it is a manufacturing community of ironworkers, carpenters, wheelwrights and lathe-operators, who at one time sold their goods throughout all of Galicia, Poland, and Lithuania. Their products-namely tables, beds and boxes-caught the attention of Rohrer during his journey through Galicia in 1804 (Bemerkungen auf einer Reise durch Galizien). He felt that these craftsmen could produce far more beautiful objects if only they had proper models. Due primarily to competition from carpenters in larger cities, especially Viennese factories, and even more to the lack of cheap and quick transportation, this industry limited itself to producing objects that met the needs of the peasants, and to wooden utensils.

Despite this Kolbuszowa has remained the same as it ever was. It has 3,262 inhabitants, of whom 151 live on the major estate. In terms of religion there are 1,275 Roman Catholics and 1,987 Jews. Kolbuszowa is the seat of a starostwo and the offices connected with it, also of a powiat council and court. It has a four-class elementary school and a pharmacy. Two doctors of medicine and two surgeons have their permanent residence in Kolbuszowa. The Rzeszow-Baranow-Tarnobrzeg highway leads through the town, and a second highway leads from the town west to Raniszow. [Translator's note: this probably refers to the town of Ranizow, except it lies east of Kolbuszowa].

Kolbuszowa was part of the Ostrog estate in tail, then belonged to the Lubomirski princes, and currently the major estate is the property of Count Zdzis. Tyszkiewicz. The major estate has 279 morgs of farmland, 93 of meadows and gardens, 33 of pastureland, and 10 of forests; the minor estate has 539 morgs of farmland, 41 of meadows and gardens, and 221 of pastureland.

The stone parish church dates from 1312. In addition to it there is also a chapel named for St. Stanislaw in the public cemetery. The parish belongs to the Diocese of Tarnow, Mielec deanery, and with its 13 affiliated localities has 9,616 Roman Catholics and 1,987 Jews. Two suburbs of the town have the names "Konczowka" or "Klodniczowka" and "Podosobnia." In Okolice Galicyi on page 99 M. Steczynski gives a description and sketch of the south side of Kolbuszowa. The city charter was granted in 1690; see Dod. do Gaz. Lwow., 1861, Nr. 25. See also "Powiat Kolbuszowski" in Holowkiewicz's "Wedrowki po kraju," Przewodnik nauk. i liter., 1878, p. 211. Kolbuszow county [powiat] stretches over sandy plains, and to the west it borders on Mielec county, to the south Ropczyce and RzeszÑw counties, to the east Lancut county, and to the north Tarnobrzeg and Nisko counties. It covers 87,586 kilometers and has 63,866 inhabitants in 65 settlements and 61 cadaster gminas. The two powiat courts in Kolbuszowa and Sokolow belong to this county.

Kolbuszowa Dolna (including Lowczowskie and Lesnictwo), 2) a village in Kolbuszowa county, 2 km. north of the town, with 1,258 Roman Catholic inhabitants. The major estate, belonging to Count Z. Tyszkiewicz, covers 181 morgs of farmland, 14 of meadows and gardens, 40 of pastureland, and 20 of forests; the minor estate covers 881 morgs of farmland, 168 of meadows and gardens, 203 of pastureland, and 13 of forests. The village has a gmina loan society with a capital of 997 zl. r.

Kolbuszowa Gorna (including Sedziszowka and Wojkowo), 3) a village in Kolbuszowa county, 2 km. south of the town, with 1,619 Roman Catholic inhabitants, a one-class elementary school, a gmina loan society with capital of 1,195 zl. r., and a distillery on the lands of the major estate. The major estate, belonging to Count Zd. Tyszkiewicz, covers 570 morgs of farmland, 64 of meadows and gardens, and 69 of pastureland; the minor estate covers 1,606 morgs of farmland, 274 of meadows and gardens, 429 of pastureland, and 49 of forests. Both these villages lie alongside the highway and belong to the Roman Catholic parish in the town of Kolbuszowa. Mac.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1883, vol. 4].

Translated by William F. Hoffman, PGSA Spring 1997 Bulletin.

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Komaszyce

Current administrative location: Komaszyce, Gmina Inowrocław, Powiat Inowrocław, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Komaszyce, Kreis Inowroclaw, Regierungsbezirk Bromberg, Provinz Posen, Kaiserlich Deutsches Reich.

A dominium located in powiat Inowrocław. The Komaszycze dominium has an area of land equal to 1023 morgs. The Komaszycze dominium has 8 houses with 103 inhabitants (all Catholics). There are 69 inhabitants that are illiterate. The post office, telegraph office, and railway station are located about 5 kilometers away in Inowrocław. Komaszycze is owned by Józef Mlicki. M.St.

The entry did not list the village's parish. The Góra Parish is located about 4-5 kilometers away.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.308].

Translated by Al Wierzba, December 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Komierówek

The folwark Komierowek (also Komierówko, little Komierowo), in Ziotow County, belonging to the knightly estate Komierowo lies 3.2 kilometers (about 2 American miles) west of the main estate, on the road leading from Sçpolno to Komierowo. In 1866 1619.70 morgs belonged to this folwark. In 1766 56 Einwohners lived here, and this number has remained more or less the same until the present day. BIazejek lake, lying in a forest west of Komierowek, is one hectare (about 2 1/2 acres) in area, and 2 to 10 meters deep (about 6 1/2 to 32.8 ft.) and contains pike and Karauschen (meaning unknown). It is said that there is a subterranean connection between this lake and the larger Nichorser lake which accounts for the appearance from time to time of pike of significant size in the Blazejek.

Source: Der Kreis Flatow -1918

Translated by Gerald R. Schmidt, Pittsburgh, PA, shmitg@bellsouth.net (Jul 2003)

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Komierowko

Also called Komierowek. A knightly estate. It comprises 2891 morgs. Buildings, including those in the village, number 59. There are 19 dwelling houses, 243 Catholics and 46 Lutherans. Parish of Waldowo.

Komierowko the village comprises 598 morgs. At the village are found ramparts called Swedish. Parish of Waldowo
.
Komierowko is a folwark comprising 19 morgs, 13 buildings, 4 dwelling houses, 51 Catholics and 29 Lutherans. Parish of Waldowo.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1880

Translated by Gerald R. Schmidt, Pittsburgh, PA, shmitg@bellsouth.net (Feb 2003)

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Komierowo

The estate and municipality of Komierowo in Ziotow County. In 1376 Comyerow, 1376 Komyrow, Comyrow, otherwise also Komirowo. Now Komierowo. Probably derives from the old Slavic chomor (bush). Komierowo lies east of Sepolno. To the estate Komierowo belongs the folwark Komieowko (also known as Komier6wek).

Komierowo belongs to the oldest dwelling places of Kraina. Since time immemorial it has belonged to the Komierowski family. Tradition tells the following: when Ziemomyl, the king of Poland died in the year 962, Mieszko, later known as Mieézystaw I, ascended the Polish throne. Mieszko and the Poles were heathens at the time. He had seven wives but no descendants. On the advice of Christian missionaries, who at that time came as a group to Poland, Mieszko decided to take a Christian wife. In 965 he sent to Boleslaw the Czech prince, and proposed to his daughter Dabrowka (Dubrovka in Czech), who, according to Czech chroniclers, was neither young nor pretty. He obtained her under the condition that he, as well as his people, would become Christian, and that he would repudiate his seven heathen wives.' He fulfilled the conditions laid upon him; in 966 he had himself baptized, and Dabrowka came to Poland. In his attendance were also the Bossuta's, a brave family. For their faithful service they received a district in Kraina where they took over or founded the villages Wlosciborz (German Lossburg) and Komierowo in a forest wilderness. (Chomor is bush in Old Slavic.) These places formed important support points for the Poles in the times of the war with the Pomeranians, and ramparts and regular entrenchments are still to be seen in these places. The Bossuta's took from the name of their estate the name Komierowski and called themselves (demonstrable from the year 1038) Bossuta-Komierowski and still today bear the coat-of-arms Pomian. Sobieslaw Bossuta-Komierowski fought in the army of king Wladyslaw Hemann (1082-1102), who struggled against the Pomeranians. The king entrenched himself in Komierowo from where he marched against Naklo which he attempted to surrender thru hunger. The Bossuta's took an active part on this march, and performed also the best service for the successor of Wladyslaw Hemann, king Boleslaw III Krzywousty (died 1139). Rugier, the bishop of Kujavia, who also belonged to the family of the Bossuta's, tells us that the Pomeranians, when they seized the city of Naklo in the year 1113, confined there Michael of Komierowo (also called Michael of Wlosciborz), who then in 1118, when Boleslaw Krzywousty conquered Naklo and forced the Pomeranians to surrender and give up their prince Swietopoelk, was found among the slain. Michael's corpse was transported to Komierowo and buried there. Around 1272 Wlosciborz Bossuta of Komierowo, archbishop of Gniezno from 1281 to 1283, the great-grandson of the slain Michael, had a church built on the spot where his forefather Michael was buried, dedicated to St. Michael, with the approval of Pope Michael III In the church was placed a tablet with the following inscription: "The sons of Sobieslaw Bossuta, Peter and Michael, of whom one lived at Wlosciborz, the other at Komierowo, received the knight's sword and the Coat-of-Arms Wieniawa from king Wladyslaw in Plock for brave deeds. Soon Michael of Wlosciborz, who belonged to the family Pomian (which came forth out of the house Wieniawa) was imprisoned by the Pomeranians and slain in battle at Naklo. Here lies the knight; here is his grave-mound, and with this church his piety-filled grandson honors the deceased hero." The metal tablet, which bore this inscription, was still there in the middle of the 18th century; where it is now is unknown. As already mentioned, the Bossuta's Peter and Michael were given the coat of arms Wieniawa when elevated to knightly rank. When, however, Lasthek Thebda de Grabie stabbed his full brother Jarandus, dean in Gniezno, out of anger and Reid (meaning unknown), king Wladyslaw II (1139-1146, died 1159) decided, in consequence of the fratricide, to remove the owners of Komierowo and Wlosciborz from the coat-of-arms community of Wieniawa , and gave them a new coat of arms that was very similar to the original, except that in remembrance of the fratricide a sword was added. This new coat of arms family received the name Pomian, from Pomni nan: "Think thereon!"

Under the descendants of the family Komierowski, which now belonged to the coat of arms Pomian, a certain Naslaw is named, who makes his appearance in 1288 as wojewoda of Sieradz and by whom the village Naslawa Laka (Naslaw's meadow) is founded. To this house belongs also the already named Wlosciborz, archbishop of Gniezno. In 1376 Joannes (Jesko) is named as hereditary lord of "Komyrow". This one, in conjunction with his brother Nicholas de Lyppa (Lipa?) and his cousin Bogusaw Crosny (Krosny?) de Obedow (Obodowo) sold the village Nasalawa Laka, which had fallen to them as an inheritance, to the Cistercian cloister at Byszewo (Krone an der Brahe); the cloister acquired 22 hides ( corresponds to a lan) and got, because of the swamp in Naslawa Laka, yet 2 hides in addition; it paid for this 160 Prague groszy. Witness of the transaction was Amoldus of Waldowo.

In 1483 there was in Komierowo a mill. A Komierowski ceded half of it consisting of a part of the village-mayor's land and a part of the farmers' land together with almost 20 marks Dotalicium (by way of a dowry or "wijana") - to his spouse. King Jan Olbracht (1493-1501) recommended in 1494 the children of Peter Komierowski, to the castellan of Spichmir(s), Jan of Brudzewo. In 1578 Przepalkowo was with Komierowo in one hand. In 1619 the owner of Komierowo was Mathias Komierowski and after him followed in 1646 his son Peter; whose son Franz was owner of Komierowo about the year 1700; on him followed Stanislaus Victor about the year 1750; this one was married to Rosalia, daughter of Kazimierz Kalkstein-Oslowski. He was royal Polish game-keeper or hunt-master, under-high-steward of Inowrochiw and burgrave of Bydgoszcz. He possessed Komierowo and Komierowek, valued at 20,000 talers, Wieszczyce, valued at 12,000 talers, Pszerowe and Wolpin, valued at 6000 talers, and Dabrowka, valued at 20,000 talers. His 10 children were Jacob, Mathias, Joseph, Ignatius, Andreas, Jadwiga, Juliana, Cecilia, Magdalena and Sophia. In 1792 Jacob received the estate Dabrowka, Mathias the estate Wieszczyce, Joseph Wolpin, Ignatius received Pszerowe, and Andreas received Komierowo and Komierowek. Daughter Jadwiga married Michael Wolszlegier. In 1800 the forenamed Jacob Komierowski, the district- and knights’-councillor, bought the estate Krajenka and besides that, Stahren. The son of Andreas Komierowski , Thomas Komierowski (married to Agata Sikorska) inherited Komierowo, then his son Dr. Roman Komierowski, the present owner of Komierowo and Nieuchowo. Dr. Roman Komierowski, papal chamberlain, is married to Maria Kurnatowska. The pair produced 4 children: 3 daughters and I son. The oldest daughter Maria is married to knightly-estate owner Janta-Potczynski of Wittstock, county of Tuchola. The second, Franciszka, is married to the owner of a great landed property in Ukrainia, the third Eleonora to count Czarnecki of Gogolewo, province of Poznania. Thomas jr. is at this time an expert or reporter to the chief of administration of the general government, Warsaw. The family paid homage to Prussia in 1772 and 1798, and in 1825 they conducted a research to prove their standing as nobility.

At the beginning of the 19th century the relations between lords and peasants were regulated. By virtue of a gift-patent the owners of Komierowo had the right of free felling in the forest of the Wiecbork-Sepolno district; eventually this patent was removed; Komierowo received as compensation 350 morgs of what was at that time the Szykorzer (Schonhorster) Sikorz? district. Let it be mentioned that in 1893 a stand of woods consisting of 128 morgs was detached from the forest-plain belonging to the knightly estate and sold for 121,000 marks. In February, 1894 a hurricane uprooted nearly 5,000 trees of the Komierowo forest.

A church was built in 1272 and dedicated to St. Michael. After the inspection tour? Visitationsrezess of 1652 the church was newly rebuilt. Two hides of land belonged to it, which the owner had under plow and for which he paid 40 florins rent to the pastor of Watdowo (to which it is a filial church). The present church was revamped in 1863 in its upper part and in 1895 a thoro repair was undertaken. The church and manor were devastated in 1656 by the Swedes. The church was rebuilt in the old form and has maintained this form to this day in spite of renovations and repairs. The original tombs are still extant and still hold almost 80 coffins. The old manor was located on the southeastern side of the church at the foot of the ramparts Wallberge. Soon after 1656 Peter Komierowski erected the present manor on the rampart north of the church. The Obergeschloss (meaning unknown) is preserved in the original way as received. The rooms in it serve as a workroom, and a library, but above all as a depository for the voluminous family archives and the interesting collection of manuscripts. There one finds the contract of sale witnessing to the estates Wiecbork and Sepolno struck between Zebrzydowski and Potulicki, debt documents from the 15th century on parchment, papal bulls, letters of the Polish kings since the beginning of the 16th century, circular letters of the Tatar Khans to the Polish crown marshal, letters of prince Sapieha from 1718 to 1780, furthermore, the handwritten poems of count Morsztyn, who accompanied king Jan Sobieski III during the siege of Vienna in 1683, then in handwriting the great heraldic work of Wieladko from the year 1802 in 12 volumes, of which only the first two have appeared in print, the diary of king Jan III Sobieski that deals with foreign affairs, and most recently the original letters of the well known Polish writer Sienkiewicz from his trip around the world, as well as a volume of his romans, likewise, handwritten. These are all valuable manuscripts, of which many await publication. Culturo-historically of great interest are women's clothes, richly embroidered and interworked with gold, from the 16th century and trip-trunks and other objects from the same time.

There is a one-room school in Komierowo.

Source: Der Kreis Flatow -1918

Translated by Gerald R. Schmidt, Pittsburgh, PA,shmitg@bellsouth.net (Jul 2003)

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Komorów

With Krzywda, Poreby and Kamionka, village in the district of Kolbuszowa, beside the road from Kolbuszowa to Tamobrzeg, it belongs to the Roman Catholic parish in Ostrowy Tuszowskie and has 1,113 Roman Catholic inhabitants. The surface of the larger estate bears 225 mórgs of fields and 370 mórgs of forests; the lesser estate 1,115 mórgs of fields, 315 mórgs of meadows and gardens, 156 mórgs of pastures and 14 mórgs of forests. The countryside is a sandy plain, 215 meters elevation above sea level, partly covered in pinewood forests. The Komorów loan office has 2,333 zloty in Austrian currency.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Volume IV, Page 312, #2, Warsaw 1883..

Submitted by: Anthony Paddock, 5015 Birney Ave., Moosic, PA 18507

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Konary

A village on the right bank of the Dunajec river, north of Zabno, in Tarnów county; it has 462 Roman Catholic inhabitants and belongs to the Roman Catholic parish in Zabno. The major estate [property owned by nobles] of K. Rudawski has an area of 238 mórgs of farmland, 22 of meadows and gardens, 15 of pastures, and 18 of forests; the minor estate [property owned by peasants] has 367 mórgs of farmland and 11 of pastures. This village has a district loan association with a capital of 538 zlotys in Austrian currency. In the 15th century Konary belonged to the monasteries in Krzyzanowice and Szczyrzyc (Dlugosz, Liber beneficiorum, I, 9; II, 407; III, 103) and was located in Otfinów parish. [Mac. {Maurycy Maciszewski}.

Note: Could not find this Konary on any map, and it is not mentioned in Nazwy miejscowe Polski (The Names of Localities in Poland), the ongoing 10-volume work edited by Kazimierz Rymut. Perhaps it no longer exists, or has been renamed. But the above entry indicates it did exist at one time, and was located north of Zabno, on the east side of the Dunajec river.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1883, vol. 4, p. 320].

Translated by William F. Hoffman, PGSA Fall 2004 Rodziny.

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Konary

Current administrative location: Konary, Gmina Dąbrowa Biskupia, Powiat Inowrocław, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Konary, Kreis Inowroclaw, Regierungsbezirk Bromberg, Provinz Posen, Kaiserlich Deutsches Reich.

3) Konary is an estate that is located powiat Inowrocław. Konary has 1819 morgs of cultivated land. There are 9 houses with 142 inhabitants (1 Evangelical Protestant and 141 Catholics). There are 72 inhabitants that are illiterate. The post office is located 2 kilometers away in Papros. The telegraph office is located 7 kilometers away in Dąbrowa (German name: Louisenfelde). The railway station is located 18 kilometers away in Inowrocław. The Konary estate is the property of Jan Dąbski.

The entry did not list the parish that the village belonged. The closest is the Kobielice Parish, which is about 2 miles away.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.320].

Translated by Al Wierzba, November 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Koneck

Current administrative location: Koneck, Gmina Koneck, Powiat Aleksandrów, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Koneck, Powiat Nieszawa, Gubernia Warszawske, Vistula Land, Russian Empire.

A village and estate located in powiat Nieszawa and gmina Straszewo. The village of Koneck belongs to the Koneck Parish. It is a distance of 35 verst from Włocławek, 11 verst from Nieszawa, and 4 verst from the Prussian border. The highway passes through Koneck toward Toruń. Half of the soil in Koneck is graded I for wheat and the other half is graded I and II for rye.

In 1580, after the collapse of the old church in Koneck, Lukasz Grabski the castellan of Kruświcki, although a heretic, issued the building of a new church. Reverend Stanisław Karnkowski, the bishop of Włocławek, was devoted to the efforts. The wooden church was named Saint Stanisław, the new church also bore the title of Saint Prokopa. Only the altar remained from the first church. The new church had two titles because of the two beautifully painted portraits of St. Stanisław and St. Prokopa, which were acquired by a Catholic patron named Marcin Grabski. In 1828, the 1st church was erected by Helena Grabska of the Walewscy nobility, and the second was erected by the Castellen of Kruszwica, Zakrzewska. After the burning of the church, the second church still stands today. It was built of wood. The church was not devoted to a patron saint, but it was blessed.

In addition to rent for fields in Koneck, the village still pays a tribute (stipend) to the village of Parochowo. About 1630, Wojciech Pijanowski endowed 4000 florins of which the pastor received a percentage of 280 florins. Also, part was given to the rector, the school organist, and the poor. Soon however, the foundation collapsed.

In 1827, Koneck had 38 houses with 406 inhabitants. The Koneck estate was comprised of the Koneck and Zieleniec folwarks and had 1489 morgs of open area.

Koneck folwark: 808 morgs of arable farm and garden land, 77 morgs of meadows, 48 morgs of pasture, 22 morgs of forest, 55 morgs of barren land, totaling 1010 morgs. There were 5 brick buildings, 13 wooden buildings, and crop rotation was distributed among six and fourteen half fields.

Zieleniec folwark: 113 morgs of arable farm and garden land, 60 morgs of meadows, 283 morgs of forest, 8 morgs of barren land, totaling 464 morgs. Plus there were 15 morgs owned for rental purposes. There were 2 brick buildings, 1 wooden building, a windmill, and crop rotation was distributed among seven half fields.

The village of Koneck has 50 settlements on 70 morgs of cultivated land. The village of Holendry Koneckie has 5 settlements on 130 morgs of cultivated land. The village of Wincentowo has 12 settlements on 16 morgs of cultivated land. The village of Biesiekierz has 8 settlements on 8 morgs of cultivated land. The village of Zieleniec has 6 settlements on 6 morgs of cultivated land. The village of Zapuset has 11 settlements on 14 morgs of cultivated land. The village of Młynek has 9 settlements on 8 morgs of cultivated land. The village of Opalonka has 10 settlements on 225 morgs of cultivated land. The village of Pomiany has 9 settlements on 10 morgs of cultivated land.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.327].

Translated by Al Wierzba, November 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Konice in Wielopole

A village near Wielopole, coming from the very edge of the Wisla River in the county of Ropczyce and belonging to the Roman Catholic parish in Wielopole Skrzyn´skie it has 339 Roman Catholics. The greater part of the Wojciechowski area has 288 morgs of farmland and 95 morgs of forest; the minor part has a total of 304 morgs of farmland and 49 morgs of forest; bordered on the south by Wielopole, on the west by Nawsiem, on the east and north by forest.

Families of members doing research in Konice. Click on researcher name to send E-mail.
Surname Date Researcher
Tralka 1892 Rosanna Rygiel

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Volume IV, Page 329, Warsaw 1883.

Translated by Elizabeth Rygiel and submitted by Rosanne Rygiel.

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Konice in Wloclaw

A village in Wloclaw county, Piaski township, Zglowiaczka parish. Belonging to the Konice estate are Kwilno, Biernatki and Lubran´czyk. In 1827 there were 11 houses with 118 inhabitants; now the area has 1583 morgs.

Source: I low Pages 270-2.

Translated by Elizabeth Rygiel and submitted by Rosanne Rygiel.

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Kopciowo

The chief village of Hancza-biala, in the county of Sejny. It is also a rural administrative district composed of several villages and the parish Kopciowo. The town is 26 versts (approx 26 km) from Sejny and 56 versts from Suwalki. The village has a wooden church and post office and is on the main road from Sejny to Grodna. There is also a shelter for elderly women and disabled people. In the year 1827, there were 30 houses and 176 residents. At present (written bet 1880 and 1902), there are 86 houses and 925 residents. There is an iron factory which employs 16 workers and produces 26000 ra (silver rubles)

In past times it was the property of the Kopciow family. Mikloaj from Kozielska Oginski, married Katarzyna Kopciowna inherited this village, laying the foundation of the wooden church in the year 1729.

Bishop Massalski of Wilno, who retained the patronage of the parish bestowed it as a legacy to the beneficiary of Wiesiejie. After Massalki, the village became the possession of Baron Zygniew, followed by Colonel Tyszkiewsicz, Sztecutyn, and Ablamowicz

Formerly Kopciowo was part of the great private manor Justanyowo.

The Parish of Kopciowo, deanery Sejny, previously Lozdiejie, had 4156 souls.

In the town cemetary one finds the grave of the great Emilii Plater who died 23 December 1831.

The rural district of Kopciowo has 4301 inhabitants and an area of 29,996 morgs. It belongs to Community Court District no. IV Wiesieje which is 11 versts from Kopciowo. The gminia(rural district) includes:

Borowka, Burby, Dumblance, Dzierze, Gierdasze, Gierwiszki, Gorance, Gulbieniszki, Helenowo, Ilgieniki, Iwaszki, Jaz, Janczule, Jozefowo, Justyanowo, Juszkance, Kopciowo, Korejwicze, Kowale, Krzywance, Lipniunce (with Zinberga Lipuniunce , gmina Lejpuny) Meciszki, Meciny, Michaliszki, Mocewicze, Narkunce, Nasuty, Niewetka, Nowiki, Olechowce, Pleszczanka, Podbudwiecie, Podhelenowo, Podjancznie, Podumble,Podlipki, Pohulanka,Polabiele, Polaczany, Przejma, Przetok, Purwinie, Siemaszki, Stoly, Subacze, Szatrance, Swietojansk, Ustronie, Walente v. Niekrzyce, Wojniunce, Wojsznary i Zmirke.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1883, vol. 4 p. 376].

Translated by Dorothy Leivers (May 2004)

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Korejwicze

A village in the parish and rural district of Kopciowo, Sejny county. It is located 25 versts from the town of Sejny and has 9 houses and 116 residents. See also with Holny Wolmera.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1883, vol. 4 p. 400].

Translated by Dorothy Leivers, Hadlow, Kent, England, Dorfleiv@aol.com (May 2004)

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Korne

Current administrative location: Korne, Gmina Kościerzyna, Powiat Kościerzyna, Województwo Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Waldarbeitergehöft Kornen, Kreis Berent, Regierungsbezirk Danzig, Westpreußen, German Empire.

The German name was Kornen. It is a peasant village located in powiat Kościerzyna. Here routes converge leading to Chojnice, Bytów, and Kościerzyna. Together counting the buildings in Nowa Karczma, the total area of land is 6706 morgs. There are 15 farmers that own their own land, 14 crofts (enclosed sections of farmland), 375 Catholics, 5 Evangelical Protestants, and 32 houses. Korne has a Catholic elementary school. The parish and post office are located in Kościerzyna, which is located 1 1/4 miles away. In 1624, Korne was granted an elected represenatative (leman) and later village status in 1750.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.405].

Translated by Al Wierzba, August 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Kosakowo

In German Kossakau. A peasant village in Wejherowo county, in the middle of the fertile Oksywie grass lands on the bay of Puck. It consists of 9 surly persons, 9 cottagers, 96 peasants, 285 Catholics, 9 Lutherans, 29 dwelling homes.

The parish is Oksywie; the school is in Kosakowo; the post office is at Zagorze. The distance from Wejherowo is 2 3/4 miles. Kosakowo exists since the earliest times. In 1210 it was mentioned by princess Swinislawa at the founding of the Norbertine Fathers in Zukowo. In 1316 it was ceded by that lady to the Cistercian cloister in Oliwa to settle various disputes . It remained with the Cistercians right up to the Prussian occupation. Then it was taken over by the state and given to the peasants. -Ks. F.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1883

Submitted & translated by Gerald R. Schmidt, Pittsburgh, PA, shmitg@bellsouth.net (Feb 2001)

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Koscielec

This name is derived from a locality. By disecting the word it is as follows: Koscie meaning bones - Lec meaning fall or sink. Thus the word cemetery emerges. Going into prehistoric history it is noted that the area was an old pagan burial ground where the custom of burning the dead bodies was then practiced. In Christian times, from the fifteenth century, this place located on the Warta river was called Koscielec.

The small village began to grow from early times and was noted a settlement (Osada) and working farmstead (Folwark) in the District of Kolo, Community and Parish Koscielec approximately 5 kilometers from the City of Kolo.

The community had its own Catholic parish and a brick Chapel on the cemetery grounds. In 1827 it was noted that there were located in this locality 34 buildings and 285 residents.The farmstead contained 9 buildings and 260 residents plus a manor with 3 occupants. On the grounds is located the prehistoric cemetery. The Parish is composed of 3130 souls as was noted in the Kolo registry. This area at this time was composed of Maryampol, Tarnowiec, Dabrowice Trzesniewo, Bylice, Debno Krolewskie, Rosocha, Czolowo and Smolarnia. The land was 5814 morg of which 1621 morg was wooded. In 1836 a large portion was taken from General of the Cavalry hr. Kreutz. This consisted of the farmsteads of Bylice, Czolowo, Rosocha, Debno, Gozdowo, Straszkow, Tarnowic, and the Windmills of the settlements of Labaj v Lokaj. Total amount was 5290 morg (Acres) of which 3104 was from the Farmsteads (Folwarks) and 2186 of woods.

The breakdown of lands and residents was as follows:

Villages of:

Bylice- 27 residents and 842 morg
Byliczki 10 residents and 200 morg
Czolowo- 14 residents and 321 morg
Rosochy-23 residents and 367 morg
Debno Krolewskie- 23 residents and 494 morg
Gozdowo-43 residents and 633 morg
Straszkow- 53 residents and 1059 morg
Bialkow- 50 residents and 741 morg
Lipiegory- 12 residents and 483 morg
Ruchenna- 14 residents and 781 morg
Jablonka- 5 residents and 28 morg
Aleksandrowka- 8 residents and 50 morg
Solowienka- 11 residents and 52 morg

Colony of Korwino Krukowskie - 36 residents and 182 morg

The total Community is about 6724 morg and 6048 residents. The Post Office is located in Kolo.

The entire community is composed of the following villages:

Bialkow
Brzuwice
Bialkow Poduch
Wakowy
Gozdow
Gasiorow
Daniszew
Dabrowice
Dabrowice Poduch
Leszcze
Koble
Police Srednie and Mostowe
Ruszkow I And I
Straszkow Poduch
Straszkow
Tury
Trzesniew
Stawki
Aleksandrowo
Arkadya
Koscielec
Maryampol
Tarnowiec
Pasieczno
Romanow
Leka

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1883 

Submitted by: Leonard Cieslak (deceased), New Port Richy, FL (Apr 1997)

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Kościelna Wieś

A Village in the powiat of Nieszawa, the gmina of Osięciny, (parish of Kościelna Wieś), creates an integrity together with the colonies Sęczkowo, Zielińsk and Włodzimierka . Generally this territory had 104 włók of open area; 59 włók of native manorial land, and the rest to the peasants and small farmers. A steam powered grinding mill and an agricultural implement factory existed here. With an annual production at 6000 rubles, 15 mechanics interestingly moved to Osięciny. The church building had a stone nave in lime mortar with barkless oak wood trusses; whereas the rectory had brick in quick set lime mortar. For centuries its existence was known, but the documents were silent as to who had constructed it. Traditionally Peter Dunin was attributed to its funding; in fact some parts of the Church originate from the 12th century. The church building itself seemed to be erected sooner than the mere village, from which it received its name. According to local legend, a man called Klimek, a knight if also a wealthy lord, had owned it and a vast country lordship. Mounds found in the middle of the marsh here and in the nearby hamlet of Bodzanówek, indicate that this location was for centuries fortified and thus inhabited . Later on, a man called Glinka, a lord here which had owned it, left himself a legacy in the digging of a canal. Similiar canals are to be found in Krzywosądz, Bełszewo and Morzyce. In the year 1639 "Kościół" which was to say Kościelna Wieś [church town], was credited to Marcin Zakrzewski. Previously it seemed the church was well endowed, because till before it found six priests belonging to it. For certain period of time the church served for people of other religion (=non-Catholic/not specified). To the parish of Kościelna Wieś belong these towns: Kościelna Wieś and the manor farm of Pułkownikowo, Sęczkowo, Zielinek, Włodzimierka, Krotoszyn, Ruszki, Pocierzyn, Bodzanówek, Bitno, Mała Ujma, Bartłomiejewice the town and colony, Zagajewice, Lekarzewice the town and colony, Osłonki, Żakowice, Konary. The parish comprised itself with 3000 souls.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego. - Warsaw 1883 

Submitted by: Allen & Marie Grasser (Feb 2009)

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Kotowa Wola

A village in Tarnobrzeg county, belonging to the Roman Catholic parish in Zaleszany and to the county court and post office in Rozwadow. It lies in a plain 155 meters above sea level, on the stream Osia, which flows from the right bank to the Leg river in the area between the confluence of the Wis_a [Vistula] and San rivers. On the west, east, and south the village is surrounded by pine forests. Of the 606 inhabitants, 46 live on the grounds of the major estate, owned by Fr. Popiel, which has 371 morgs of farmland, 128 of meadows and gardens, 83 of pastureland, and 833 of forests. The minor estate has 219 morgs of farmland, 149 of meadows and gardens, and 179 of pastureland. The district savings society has a capital of 160 zl. in Austrian currency. Kotowa Wola is bordered on the north by Zaleszany and Zbydniow, on the east by Turbia, on the south by Jamnica, and on the west by Zabrnie, a settlement on the outskirts of Grebow. Dr. Jachno collected mollusks in the vicinity of Kotowa Wola.—(Mac. [Dr. Maurycy Maciszewski], Vol. IV, p. 32).

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1883].

Translated by William F. Hoffman, PGSA Fall 2002 Rodziny.

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Kowale

A small village in the parish and rural district of Kopciowo, Sejny county. It is 20 versts from the town of Sejny with 16 houses and 132 inhabitants. See also Holny Wolmera

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1883, vol. 4 p. 376].

Translated by Dorothy Leivers, Hadlow, Kent, England, Dorfleiv@aol.com (May 2004)

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Kowalowy

Kowalowy (sometimes called Kowalowka) [Editor: apparently now called Kowalowa], with Gilowa, a village in Tarnow powiat, served by the Roman Catholic parish in Ryglice. It is situated in a hilly, wooded area at the source of the Jodlowka. The village itself is located in a valley 318 meters above sea level. To the north it borders on a small forest spreading over the hills that reach an elevation of 341 meters above sea level, while to the south it is surrounded by great pine forests with various names, covering the area between the Biala and the Wisloka rivers. The highest points of the nearby hills mark the border between the powiats of Tarnow, Pilzno, Grybow and Jaslo. To the south of the village is Kowalowy Mountain, 508 meters high. The road from Pilzno to Tuchow runs through the village. 78 of its 877 inhabitants live on the premises of the major estate. There is a one-class public school there. The major estate comprises 681 morgs of farmland and 308 of forests. The minor estates have 883 morgs of farmland and 86 of forests. Kowalowy borders Lubcza to the north, Joniny to the west, and Jodlowa to the east. [Mac.-Vol. IV, p. 515].

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1883 

Submitted by: Robert Bator, Chicago, IL. Translated by Anna Pawlik (2001)

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Krajna

In documents as Croja, Kroja, Crayen, Kraine, and Kraina. An area of land in West Prussia and Kreis Poznań, it covers the entire Złotowo Powiat and the northern parts of powiats Bydgoszcz, Wyrzysk, and Chodzież. The shape creates an almost regular square. Krajna has natural boundaries, i.e quite substantial rivers, such as: the Wisła to the east; the Noteć to the south; the Gwde (Kuddow) to the west; and the Dobrynke and Kamionke to the north. The length of this area from East-West is about 14 miła, the north-south width is about 7 miła.

In terms of political and ecclesiastical considerations, Krajna is split into two parts. The southern part, with the cities: Koronowo, Mroczyn, Bydgoszcz, Fordon, Wyrzyska, Łobżenica, Wysoka, Nakło, Miasteczko, Piła, belonging to the Duchy of Poznań. The northern part was attached to West Prussia, with the Krajna cities: Kamień, Sępolno, Więcbork, Złotowo and Krajenka. The political boundaries, with small exceptions, correspond to the ecclesiastical divisions. The northern Prussian part belonged to the Chełmno Diocese and the southern part belonged to the Poznań-Gnieźno Archdiocese. Only the surroundings of the cities of Fordon and Koronowo are joined to the Chełmno Diocese. Historically before the occupation, Krajna as a whole belonged to Poland. So regarding the churches in the cities, they came under the authority of the Archbishopric of Gnieźno. Until 1822, the following cities were formerly of the archdeaconry of Kamień: Kamień, Sępolno, Więcborsk, Złotowo, and Krajenka, and became associated with the Chełmno Diocese.

All these cities are connected by well traveled roads that go through the length and breadth of Krajna. Railways carried people from Piła to Miasteczko, Nakło to Bydgoszcz in the west-east direction. Moreover, in a northerly direction from Piła to Krajenka, Złotowo to Chojnice, and Bydgoszcz to Tczew. There is a proposed railway from Chojnice to Nakło. In addition to the flow of border rivers listed, the most important are: the Brda underneath Koronowo and the Wisła by Bydgoszcz; the Noteć from Łobżenica to Wyrzysk; the Gwda from Krajenka to Glumia; and others. Generally, the soil is fertile and rich, however there are sandy places, swampy, woody, and flat (płaszczysta) areas.

Under the terms of the national population of Krajna, many suffered particularly in the latter times of the occupation. Larger and smaller manors were owned by Germans, probably with some exceptions. Nevertheless, this is a Polish land mark and the people strongly hold onto their land and their native rights.

Krajna was initially part of Eastern Pomerania and were dependents of the Pomeranian Dukes. In addition, in terms of the following story, it was here in Nakło, which was the main Pomeranian stronghold, where the bloody battles between the Polish and Pomeranians played out. It was not until 1121 that this land was acquired by Bolesław III for Poland, at which it was preserved until the divisions in 1772. The Teutonic Knights often tried to seize Krajna. For example, in 1331, they took a part of the land in Kamień and had their commanders there until about 1339. However, soon after the Peace Treaty of Kalisz in 1343, it was taken away again. In 1409, Gamrad von Rintzenau, the commander in Człuchów, came with his armies to Krajna and ravaged the cities and villages. Also, in 1430, the army of the Teutonic Knights ran through Krajna. In 1433, the loose armed men who were attached to the Hussites Division, that were passing through Krajna, plundered in Tuchola (Ob. Schmitt, der Kreis Flatow, str. 16, 24, 31, 33, 35, 45, 47, 50, 75).

"Powiats: Bydgoszcz, Wyrzysk, Czarnków, and Chodzież are the people by Krajna" (Bibl. Warsz. 1864 I, 285. Libelt w Roczn. Tow. Przyj. nauk pozn. VII, 74). The engaging Juliusz Bartoszewicz pontificated about Krajna in "Bibl. Warsz. 1864, I.", that the so-called South Slavic "Krajna", in the Miklosicha phrase (Carniola, Karyntya), is not derived from the word "Kraj (country)". Compare to Ukraina (J. Karł. w Pam. flzyogr. II, 1883; Kod. dypl. pol. II, 288). Krajna is also a narrow strip embankment on the left bank of the lower Drwęca (G. Zieliński, Bibl. Warsz. 1861). See also Czarno. Kś Fr.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.584].

Translated by Al Wierzba, October 2010. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Krajniacy

A population residing in the vast land of Krajna in Wielkopolskie, present day West Prussia and Kreis Poznań, some cities are: Złotowo, Sępolno, Koronowo, Wyrzysk, Łobżenica, up to Bydgoszcz. For the most part they sit on fertile fields. They are stocky and stubborn, because they tend to have a grosz (penny) in their pocket. Here we encounter loss, in other farming village districts, to the peasants of 80 and gradually 100 morgs of land. Horses tend to be grown and pastured often in moderation, because of the peculiar care of them by the Krajniaks (people of Krajna). During mud and thaw, it will wade through the slippery roads, as long as the horse is not resting on Sunday, it could rear up and kick, in front of the church.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, pp.584-585].

Translated by Al Wierzba, October 2010. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Krauszow

A village in the administrative district of Novy Targ (powiat), woj. Nowy Sacz, lying on the north bank of the Czarny Dunajec River 5 kilometers from Nowy Targ. It borders on the north with Morawczyna village, on the west with Dlugopole, and on the south with Rogoznik. There is a beautiful view on Tatra Mountains, and to the east with Ludzmierz a view of Gorce Forest. On the eastside of the territory is the stream Lepietmica, to the south the river Czarny Dunajec with the Czarny and Babim, also known as Czerwony stream. On north side is the hill Smrodowka, 685 meters above sea level. The height of village above the river is 611 meters at the source of the river Czarny.

In year 1777, 44 houses, 212 Christians.
In year 1799, 61 houses, 321 Christians.
In year 1824, 67 houses, 381 Christians and 1 Jewish family, containing 2 people
In year 1869, 86 houses, 434 Christians (214 men and 220 women).
In year 1880, 480 Christians.

On Hawierka hill is a tavern run by a Jewish man.

The larger territory of plowed land has 86 morgow (Austrian). The smaller territory of plowed land has 575 mr,, fields and gardens of118 mr, pastures of 294 mr, forest of 9 mr. The owner is Wlodzimierz Tetmajer.

The village belongs to the parish in Ludzmierz. Village already existed in 1255 under the name Crausow - the village privilege was given by Wladyslaw Wstydliwy in Krakow. The possession belonged to cloister of Cistercian monks in Szczyrzyc and because of that they lived in freedom and comfort. In 1382 Stejan, a citizen of Krakow bought Soltystwo from Henry, a Cistercian leader of the monks. Until the end of 19th century Cistercians were the owners of Krauszow. Then Emanuel and Aleksader Homolacz rented it to Klementyna Homolacz and with Ludzmierz and Rogoznic later sold it on August 1, 1859 to Adolp Tetmajer for 18900 zl. It should be added that from the privileges of Dyonize, a monk of Szczyrzyc, a certificate dated 25 March 1353, mentions Grabszhow as the name of the village.

In 1935 there are 749 catholic people. The tavern no longer exists. In its place is a tiny chapel built with rough stones.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1883

Submitted and Translated by: Rose Szczech (Apr 1998)

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Krobia

Current administrative location: Krobia, Gmina Kadzidło, Powiat Ostrołęka, Województwo Mazowieckie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Krobia, Powiat Ostrołęka, Gubernia Łomża, Vistula Land, Russian Empire.

2) Listed in documents as Crow. A village located in powiat Ostrołęka. Krobia belongs to the Kadzidło Parish. The village is owned by the Płock chapter, who, in 1187, issued a summons Krzywosąd for certain reimbursements.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.15b, p.165].

Translated by Al Wierzba, September 2010. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Kropiwne Nowe and Stare

A village in Suwalki county, Kuków gmina, Bakalarzew parish [now called Bakalarzewo]. It is about 10 km. from Suwalki. In 1827 it was a government-owned village with 20 houses, 116 inhabitants; currently Kropiwne Stare has 33 houses, 265 inhabitants, and Kropiwne Nowe has 11 houses and 63 inhabitants.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1883 [Vol. 4, p. 697].

Translated by William F. Hoffman, PGSA Winter 2004 Rodziny.

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Krukowo

A village on the river Omulew in Przasnysz county, Zareby gmina and parish, about 37 km. from Przasnysz. It has 73 houses, 425 inhabitants, 727 morgs of land, 912 unused. It lies on the very edge of the forest of Myszyniec. In 1827 it had 46 houses and 233 inhabitants.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1883 [ Vol. 4, page 727].

Translated by William F. Hoffman, PGSA Winter 2003 Rodziny.

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Kruśliwiec

Current administrative location: Kruśliwiec, Gmina Inowrocław, Powiat Inowrocław, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Kruschlewitz, Kreis Inowroclaw, Regierungsbezirk Bromberg, Provinz Posen, Kaiserlich Deutsches Reich.

A dominium located in powiat Inowrocław. The Kruśliwiec dominium has an area of land equal to 377 morgs. The Kruśliwiec dominium has 3 houses with 56 inhabitants (all Catholics). There are 29 inhabitants that are illiterate. The post office, telegraph office, and railway station are located about 7 kilometers away in Inowrocław.

The entry did not list the village's parish. The Kościelec Parish is located about 3-4 kilometers away.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.733].

Translated by Al Wierzba, December 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Krusza

Current administrative location: Krusza Duchowna, Gmina Inowrocław, Powiat Inowrocław, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Groß Morin, Kreis Strelno, Regierungsbezirk Bromberg, Provinz Posen, Kaiserlich Deutsches Reich.

In documents it was also called Crzusa, a village located in powiat Inowrocław. In documents dating in 1356, the Bishop of Kujawy, Mateusz, sold tithes to the villages listed in the tables of the Bishopric of Włocławek. The tithes were sold to pay for the newly provisioned Włocławek Cathedral and the efforts of the Bogufała school (Ulanow. Dok. Kuj., 250, 76). In 1583, Krusza had three parts: Krusza (church owned), Krusza Podlodowa, and Krusza Zambkowa. All three areas comprised a total of 5 łan. They belonged to the Ludzisko Parish.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.15b, p.173].

Translated by Al Wierzba, July 2010. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Krusza Duchowna

Current administrative location: Krusza Dochowna, Gmina Inowrocław, Powiat Inowrocław, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Lindenthal, Kreis Strelno, Regierungsbezirk Bromberg, Provinz Posen, Kaiserlich Deutsches Reich.

1) Krusza Duchowna (German name: Lindenthal). A village located in powiat Inowrocław. Krusza Duchowna has 20 houses with 257 inhabitants (100 Catholics and 157 Evangelical Protestants). There are 66 inhabitants that are illiterate. The ownership of Krusza Duchowna belonged to the Włocławek chaplain located in Dziewa. The post office is located about 5 kilometers away in Markowice. The telegraph office and railway station are located about 8 kilometers away in Inowrocław.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.733].

Translated by Al Wierzba, December 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Krusza Podlotowa

Current administrative location: Krusza Podlotowa, Gmina Inowrocław, Powiat Inowrocław, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Kruszapodludowa , Kreis Inowroclaw, Regierungsbezirk Bromberg, Provinz Posen, Kaiserlich Deutsches Reich.

2) Krusza Podlotowa (German name: Klein-Kruscha). A dominium located in powiat Inowrocław. The Krusza Podlotowa dominium has an area of land equal to 840 morgs. Krusza Podlotowa has 3 houses with 95 inhabitants (66 Catholics and 29 Evangelical Protestants). There are 47 inhabitants that are illiterate. There are peat bogs throughout the dominium. The post office is located about 4.5 kilometers away in Markowice (German name: Markowitz). The telegraph office and railway station are located about 7 kilometers away in Inowrocław. Krusza Podlotowa is owned by Marianna Grabski.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.733].

Translated by Al Wierzba, December 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Krusza Zamkowa

Current administrative location: Krusza Zamkowa, Gmina Inowrocław, Powiat Inowrocław, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Groß-Kruscha, Kreis Strelno, Regierungsbezirk Bromberg, Provinz Posen, Kaiserlich Deutsches Reich.

3) Krusza Zamkowa (German name: Gross-Kruscha). A dominium located in powiat Inowrocław. The Krusza Zamkowa dominium has an area of land equal to 1571 morgs. Krusza Zamkowa has 13 houses with 207 inhabitants (169 Catholics and 38 Evangelical Protestants). There are 56 inhabitants that are illiterate. Krusza Zamkowa belongs to the owner of the sugar company in Kruszwica. The post office is located about 4 kilometers away in Markowice. The telegraph office and railway station are located about 7 kilometers away in Inowrocław. See also the entry for Kobylniki [1895, vol.3, p.297]. M. St.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.733].

Translated by Al Wierzba, December 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Kruszewo

Current administrative location: Kruszewo, Gmina Lipusz, Powiat Kościerzyna, Województwo Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Kruschewen, Kreis Berent, Regierungsbezirk Danzig, Westpreußen, German Empire.

1.) The German name is Kruschewen. It is a peasant village located in powiat Kościerzyna and along the main Chojnice-Kościerzyna route. The landscape is woody and sandy. The area is listed with 357 morgs of land, 2 tenant farmers, 33 Catholics, and 3 houses. The parish is located in Lipusz. The school and post office are located in Kalisz. The last known privilege was given to this village on 5 July 1766.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.736].

Translated by Al Wierzba, August 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Krzywance

A village in the parish of Miroslaw, rural district Kopciowo, Sejny County. It is 37 versts from Sejny. In 1827 it was a government village with 6 houses and 43 residents. It now has 9 houses and 95 residents.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1883, vol. 4 p. 376].

Translated by Dorothy Leivers, Hadlow, Kent, England, Dorfleiv@aol.com (May 2004)

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Krzywki Bratki

A village in Mlawa county, Zielona gmina, Kuczbork parish; it has 29 houses, 376 inhabitants, and 1,141 morgs of land, including 500 of farmland, 1,108 belonging to the manor. It has a windmill and an inn. In 1827 there were 25 houses there and 178 inhabitants.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1883 [ Vol. 4, page 809].

Translated by William F. Hoffman, PGSA Spring 2003 Rodziny.

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Krzywki Piaski

A village in Mlawa county, Mostowo gmina, Szrensk parish; it lies on extensive marshes that stretch from Zuromin, 19 km. from Mlawa. It has 22 houses and 189 inhabitants; the peasant-owned lands total 264 morgs, including 206 of farmland. Next to this village lies Krzywki-Boski and the manorial farmstead of the same name, which belongs to the village of Mostowo. In 1827 Krzywki-Piaski had 9 houses and 70 inhabitants; Krzywki-Boski had 3 houses and 8 inhabitants.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1883 [ Vol. 4, page 809].

Translated by William F. Hoffman, PGSA Spring 2003 Rodziny.

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Kubra

Kubra, also called Kuberka, a village and manorial farmstead in Kolno powiat, Kubra gmina, parish of Prztyuly. It has an elementary school. The village has an area of 1,560 morgs. In 1826 it had 28 houses and 163 inhabitants. Kubra gmina has 5,209 inhabitants and an area of 10,627 morgs, with an office in the village of Przytuly-Majorat. The gmina court, lst district, and the post office are in the settlement of Stawiski. The gmina includes 24 noble villages: Bagienice, Barwiki-Jurgiele, Borawskie-Przytuly, Brychy-Karwowo, Chrostowo-Wielkie, Chrzanowo-Wypychy, Czaki-Slazy, Gardoty, Gnatowo, Grzymki, Kurkowo, Loje-Awyssa, Loje-Grezko, Mieczki-Czarne, Mroczki-Kamienny-Stok, Obrytki, Pienki-Grodzisko, Pluty-Rogowo, Ramoty, Rosochate, Supy-Grezko, Slazy-Grezko, Trzaski and Wagi-Gnaty. It also includes 16 peasant villages: Aleksandrowo, Chrzanowo-Cyprki, Debowka, Doliny, Glinki, Konopki-Blonie, Kubra (or Kuberka), Lisy, Okrasin, Przytuly, Przytuly-Poduchowne, Przytuly-Majorat, Racibory-Pergi, Romany, Siwki and Wilamowo. According to the Land Credit Society, the Kubra manorial farmstead has an area of 1,106 morgs: 605 of farmland and gardens, 36 of meadows, 75 of pastures, 200 of woods, 150 of thickets, 40 of unused land and public squares. It has 3 stone buildings, 14 wooden ones; 7-field crop rotation; a distillery, water mill, peat and lime deposits. The river Przytulanka runs through it. The village of Kubra has 34 settlements with 111 morgs of land. [Br(onislaw) Ch(lebowski) - Vol. IV, p. 834]. JAdditional information in the supplemental volume 15]: Kubra, a village in Kolno powiat. Formerly a village owned by a duke. In 1436 the Mazovian duke Wladyslaw stayed there (according to Kapica, Herbarz, 307). He dates a charter for Barwiki as issued there in 1437. In 1445 the same duke granted Stanislaw "de Rogossowo" (Rogozew?) 60 lans in the village of Kubra (Kapica, Herbarz 354). [Vol. 15b, p. 188].

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1883].

Translated by William F. Hoffman, PGSA Winter 2001 Rodziny.

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Kuczbork

Also known as Kuczborek, a municipal settlement on the river Przylepnica in Mlawa county, Zielona gmina, Kuczbork parish, 22 km. from Mlawa, and about 7.5 from Szrensk. It lies on the edge of extensive marshes that stretch for a length of 10 km. from Zuromin. It has a parish church made of stone, date of construction unknown, as well as a synagogue, gmina office, and elementary school. In 1827 there were 29 houses there, with 426 in-habitants; in 1860 there were 37 houses and 672 inhabitants (342 of them Jews). Currently it has 103 houses, 1,130 inhabitants, and 2,806 morgs of land that belong to the settlement.

This ancient settlement was formerly the property of the Mazovian princes. Prince Ziemowit of Plock sold it in 1384 to Jedrzej of Radzikow, the castellan of Dobrzyn, and granted the settlement a charter to found a city on terms of Chelmno law. From that point Kuczbork remained for a long time in the hands of the Kuczborski family, but could not develop further due to the absence of favorable circumstances. The famous writer and theologian Walenty Kuczborski, son of the lord of Kuczbork, came from there, born there in 1525. In the 18th century the lord of Kuczbork was Bogdan Mostowski, castellan of Plock; in 1748 he erected a new wooden church on the site of an old one that had burned down. The parish of Kuczbork, of Mlawa deanery, has 2,130 souls.

According to the Land Credit Association, the manorial farmstead of Kuczbork (with the settlement and village of Kuczbork, and the villages of Olszewko and Osowa) has 1,173 morgs of land; there are 677 of farmland and gardens, 119 of meadows, 3 of pastureland, 326 of forests, 48 occupied by squares and unused, with 21 buildings made of wood, 11-field crop rotation, a lime-kiln, brickyard, and deposits of limestone and peat. The settlement of Kuczbork consists of 54 settlements, with 712 morgs of land; the village of Kuczbork has 58 settlements, with 785 morgs of land; the village of Olszewko has 13 settlements, with 757 morgs of land; and the village of Ossowa has 4 settlements, with 187 morgs of land. [Br{onislaw} Ch{lebowski}.

Source: Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1883 [ Vol. 4, page 841].

Translated by William F. Hoffman, PGSA Spring 2003 Rodziny.

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Kuczkowo

Current administrative location: Kuczkowo, Gmina Zakrzewo, Powiat Aleksandrów, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Kuczkowo, Powiat Nieszawa, Gubernia Warszawske, Vistula Land, Russian Empire.

A village located in powiat Nieszawa and gmina Sędzin. The village belongs to the parish of Sędzin. It was owned by the Carmelites of Płock. In 1827, the village, of the government, had 12 homes with 107 inhabitants (Por. Kod. dypl. pol. II, 483).

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.842].

Translated by Al Wierzba, May 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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Kujawka

Current administrative location: Kujawka, Gmina Bądkowo, Powiat Aleksandrów, Województwo Kujawsko–Pomorskie, Poland.

Administrative location in 1895 (Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego): Kujawka, Powiat Nieszawa, Gubernia Warszawske, Vistula Land, Russian Empire.

A village located in powiat Nieszawa and gmina Bądkowo. Kujawka belongs to the Bądkowo Parish.

Source: Słownik Geograficzny Królestwa Polskiego - Warsaw [1895, vol.4, p.850].

Translated by Al Wierzba, November 2009. Originally posted on Al's Polish-American Genealogy Research Blog.

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